Don’t Call Me Princess!

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ARE YOU fed up of Fairy-Tale Princesses waiting to be saved? And DO YOU want some decent heroines who aren’t so well behaved? WHAT IF we gave the Little Mermaid, Sleeping Beauty and Snow White Some BRAND NEW Happy-Ever-Afters… and an up-to-date rewrite! Our story starts, dear reader, about five years ago when my daughter looked like this: Quite little, … Read More

“…a wonderfully composed and lively book.”

Luxemburg’s discussion of credit under monopoly capitalism is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand why the capitalist economy crashed in 2007-2008 and why it will crash again.  Her unrelenting opposition to imperial war and disgust with those who call themselves socialist yet support such wars is an inspiration… Counterpunch

“…conveys Luxemburg’s life and thought with warmth and humour.”

Red Rosa is extensively researched and presents the public and private Luxemburg in her own words, taken from her works and letters. It highlights how her thinking on economics was far ahead of its time. Long before the terms “military industrial complex” and “globalisation” were coined, Luxemburg talked about a… Jewish Chronicle.

“…entirely humanises this uncompromising political firebrand.”

This superb graphic novel not only succeeds in telling the life story of the Marxist theorist and revolutionary socialist, Rosa Luxemburg, but also manages to advance many of the central tenants behind her beliefs in a clear and concise manner.  She was born to a Jewish family in Poland… The Crack Magazine

“…this book is the perfect entry point.”

Luxemburg sought to “affect people like a clap of thunder” in a political landscape where revolution competed with reform. An obvious question when approaching a new book on Luxemburg is whether her activism still speaks to us today.  After reading Kate Evans’ new graphic novel, Red Rosa, the answer is clearly yes… Beyond Chron.

“Evans startles and inspires with her beautiful symbiosis of graphic and text…”

“There’s only one tiny, limping, Jewish girl spreading the socialist word,” Rosa Luxemburg’s Polish comrades tell her in Kate Evans’s graphic biography, Red Rosa. Rosa Luxemburg’s Jewishness, her gender, her astounding intellect and independence, even her limp, all served to make her notorious among her political enemies; they also made… Bookslut.com

The People’s Shortlist of must-read inspiring books.

The People’s Shortlist of must-read inspiring books 1) The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists – Robert Tressell. 2) Red Rosa: A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg – Kate Evans. 3) The Moth Snowstorm – Michael McCarthy. 4) Orison for a Curlew – Horatio Clare. 5) 23 Things they Don’t Tell you About Capitalism – Ha Joon Chang… Caroline Lucas

“How do you beat that for interpretative biographical commentary?”

Red Rosa has 23 pages of doubled-columned scholarly notes at the back of the book explaining the basis of virtually every dialogue balloon and every panel of narrative. When you read Red Rosa, flipping between the notes and the narrative, it feels like a hologram of ideas because you see… artsjournal.com